Weddings

Spring and summer seems to be the time for weddings. Most weddings are planned well in advance and leave the bride crossing her fingers for the weather to suit her plans, especially for the wedding photographs. A bride usually has a lot of control over the day, but the weather is one, often critical, factor which is completely out of the control of anyone. My advice is have a nice alternative planned, such as somewhere in one of the venues you have booked, and don’t panic about it. I’d also recommend planning well in advance. We pink wedding card_tnwere unlucky, our venue burnt down months before the wedding, but having booked well enough in advance, we were able to find an alternative that was available for our chosen date. The alternative wasn’t ideal, being a stark hall as compared to the medieval barn we had first booked because it fitted our medieval/celtic theme, but the staff were very understanding, being aware of the fire, so I think we got the very best of service from them and the day was amazing.

Our wedding was in April and we had a sunny day which was warm enough that I didn’t need to put on the new cape I purchased in case it was cold. We had our photos taken out on the lawns at the registry office as the venue didn’t have any gardens, but there was also places inside the venue that could have been used, with appropriate decorations to make it look festive.

favour boxOur wedding was hand crafted. I embossed the paper and then printed the invitations myself. My mother made my wedding dress and my husband’s suit. My auntie made the wedding cake. I made up all the favour boxes (from kits), adding a sticker to the top to make them look more in theme. I had friends make pottery pots for potpourri on the tables. My father-in-law-to-be and I sat and made up all the table flowers and bouquets the night before the wedding.

 

What I really enjoyed was the research, weddingcaketo try and get some of the items more authentically medieval or celtic. I learnt that the wedding cake as we know it was introduced in the Victorian era. In medieval times the guests brought individual seed cakes for the bride and groom. These seed cakes lasted a long time. With no cake to cut, the tradition was to build all the cakes into a pile and for the bride and groom to kiss over the tower. If they managed to kiss without knocking any down, they believed the couple would have good luck. So that’s what we had, a pile of individual seeded cakes. I also found out that the flowers in bouquets can be symbolic. I sourced artificial flowers and now have them all in a basket on the kitchen window sill. I chose red roses which represent love, orange blossom which represents marriage, lavender which represents devotion, ivy which represents friendship, wheat which means wealth and eucalyptus leaves to represent my childhood in Australia.

The range of items at Didi Lou Crafts includes a few items that would make nice gifts for the bride and groom or members of the bridal party and there are a few cards that might be appropriate with more to be added in time. See https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/DidiLouCrafts for these and many more items.

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